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Harvard Citation Style: Reference Formats

In This Guide...


Click on the links below for further information on referencing each material type

 

Introduction

Reference Formats

    Books/eBooks

    • No Authors
    • 1, 2 or More Authors
    • No Editors
    • 1, 2 or More Editors
    • Chapters in Books

    Company Information

    • Company Reports
    • Company Profiles

    Conference Proceedings

    • Print
    • Online

    Internet/Websites

    • Websites
    • Blogs
    • Web Images
    • Web Documents
    • Computer Software

    Journal Articles

    • CMO Articles
    • Print
    • Online

    Lecture Notes

    Multimedia Formats

    • Audio-Visual Material

    Newspaper Articles

    • Print
    • Online

    Patents & Standards

    • Citing Patents: Examples
    • Citing Patents: Standards

    Theses

    • Citing Theses: Examples

    All Examples

    • A table of examples in all formats for quick reference

    References by Format

    This guide divides references into different formats for ease of use. Hover your cursor over the Reference Formats tab to select the format you want, or select from the links below.

    The overarching principle in referencing or citing is that readers should be able to follow your sources if they are interested in finding out more about a topic and that you should acknowledge other authors whose ideas or information you have used.

    What if I want to cite some information that someone else has cited?

    If you read an article or book which cites some information that you want to cite, always refer to the source where you found the information, not the original source. For example:

    Sue reads an article by Alex Byrne in the Australian Library Journal in which he cites or refers to statements made by Tim O'Reilly on his website at http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html Sue wants to refer to O'Reilly's statement in her assignment.

    Sue would acknowledge O'Reilly in her text but her reference is to the source where she saw the information. Sue might write as her in-text reference:

    (O'Reilly, cited in Byrne 2008)


    In her reference list Sue would write a reference for Byrne's article because that's where she sourced the information. The entry in her References would be:

    Byrne, A 2008, 'Web 2.0 strategies in libraries and information services', The Australian Library Journal, vol. 57 no. 4, pp. 365-376.

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