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GW Research Day Resources: Writing Abstracts

GW Research Day: Workshops for Health Sciences


Ramp Up for GW Research Day Workshops:
The ABCs of Abstract Writing

Instructor: Dr. Linda Werling
November 9, 2016

  • DescriptionNeed help writing an abstract for GW Research Day?  Learn the key components of how to summarize your major findings and write an effective abstract.

Link to the Recorded Session: ABCs of Abstract Writing Workshop
(This video is restricted to members of the GW community. Please log in with your GW NetID and password.)

Presenter: See examples of well written abstracts
2016 Research Day submissions:

(All examples consent/permission to post was obtained)
Shawn Chiang  Smoking Characteristics and Psychiatric Comorbidities of Pregnant Smokers: An Analysis of Quit4Baby Randomized Controlled Trial 
(Milken Institute School of Public Health)
Avinash Chandran

Time Trends in Incidence and Severity of Injury among NCAA Soccer Players, 1990-1996 and 2004-2009
(Milken Institute School of Public Health)

Ivan Suarez Castellanos

Ultrasound Stimulation of Insulin Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells 
(Department of Biomedical Engineering)
Caitlin Bove  Diet as a Risk Factor in Obstructive Sleep Apnea
(School of Medicine and Health Sciences)

 

Tips to Avoid

Too much information:
Avoid including too much background information and details. Should be succinct!
Incomplete sentences:
Avoid using bullets or incomplete phrases.
Jargon: 
Avoid abbreviations, acronyms and jargon unless it is well known to almost all readers (e.g. CDC)
Images/Tables/Graph/References:
Any sort of image, illustration, figure, or table, or references to them.

Abstract Components

Problem Statement/Introduction:
Make the case why this research is important. Remember to use words that will grab the reader’s attention.
(How does it contribute to the scholarly literature? Identify the gap . Include hypothesis.)

Methods:
What was done to obtain results
(Include research design, setting, population and sample size, duration of the study, research instrument, treatment/procedure)

Results:
Connect to methods – as a result of conducting the above procedure submit what were your findings.
(Refrain from analyzing results)

Conclusion:
Major implications of your findings.
(Include analysis and outcomes)

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